Medicine Institute

Prepare to make a positive impact through medicine.

Interested in donning the white coat, but not sure what being a healthcare professional is really like? Gain hands-on experience in the medical field and insight into the many career opportunities available within the various disciplines of medicine. You’ll visit healthcare facilities in Winston-Salem, participate in simulations and labs, and learn basic skills like taking blood pressure and suturing.

At a Glance

Dates: June 19 – 24 or July 10 – 15, 2022

Who Can Apply?: 9th – 12th grade students

Overnight Tuition: $2,700

Day-Camp Tuition: $1,800

Location: Winston-Salem, NC – Wake Forest University Campus

**Courses carry no secondary school or college credit. Upon completion of the program, an official Wake Forest University Certificate of Completion will be awarded to all Medicine Institute participants.

What You’ll Experience

Topics Covered:

  • Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology
  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics
  • Cancer Care
  • Medical Research
  • COVID-19

 

Hands-On Experiences:

  • On-site visits to healthcare facilities in Winston-Salem, NC
  • Tour the Wake Forest School of Medicine and participate in simulation labs
  • Explore technology and the latest in medical advances within the hospital including the operating room and cardiac cath lab
  • Practice taking blood pressure, listening to the heart, working in a suture lab, and conducting an ultrasound
  • Interact, Network, and Engage with medical school students

*Hands-on experiences are subject to change.

Medicine Institute Costs

Overnight | $2,700

Day | $1,800

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A Day in the Life

Winston-Salem Campus:

  • 8:00 am – Morning Meeting and Breakfast
  • 9:00 am – Welcome and Program Introduction
  • 9:30 am – Guest Speaker: Pursuing Pre-Med in College
  • 10:30 am – Travel to Hospital
  • 11:00 am – Guest Speaker: Research in Medicine
  • 11:30 am – Pathways to Healthcare: Medical Student Panel
  • 12:00 pm – Lunch
  • 12:45 pm – Station 1: Ultrasound Lab
  • 1:35 pm – Station 2: Birthing Simulation
  • 2:30 pm – Station 3: Respiratory Management
  • 3:30 pm – Station 4: Cardiovascular Simulation
  • 4:10 pm – Tour of Wake Forest School of Medicine
  • 4:30 pm – Travel to Wake Forest University main campus
  • 5:30 pm – Dinner
  • 6:30 pm – Evening Activities
  • 7:30 pm – Free Time
  • 9:00 pm – Prepare for Bed
  • 10:00 pm – Lights Out

*The “A Day in the Life” sample schedule is subject to change. 

Meet Your Academic Leaders

Lindsay Strowd, MD

Academic Leader, Medicine Institute 

Lindsay Strowd is currently an Associate Professor of Dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Health and also serves as Core Teaching Faculty for the School of Medicine. Dr. Strowd attended Duke University and graduated in 2005 then went on to complete her medical school training at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She completed her intern year in internal medicine followed by three years of dermatology residency where she served as chief resident. Dr. Strowd’s current clinical interests include cutaneous lymphoma, complex medical dermatology, and inpatient dermatology.

 

Roy Strowd, MD

Academic Leader, Medicine Institute 

Roy Strowd is currently an Associate Professor of Neurology and Neuro-Oncology at Wake Forest Baptist Health. Dr. Strowd attended Duke University and graduated in 2005 then went on to complete his medical school training at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. He completed his intern year in internal medicine followed by three years of neurology residency where he served as chief resident. He completed his fellowship in Neuro-Oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2015 prior to moving back to Winston-Salem. Dr. Strowd’s current clinical and research interests include clinical trials for novel brain tumor therapies, the impact of cancer and chemotherapy on immune function, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Dr. Strowd serves as Core Teaching Faculty for the Wake Forest School of Medicine, directs the Health Professions Education Institute for career development in medical education, and serves on the editorial boards of two premier journals in neurology and neuro-oncology.

Both Drs. Strowd were elected to Alpha Omega Alpha honor society as junior members during medical school and both were recipients of the Arnold P. Gold Humanism in Medicine award. They were part of the student group that founded the successful student-run DEAC free health clinic and helped found the Resident Quality Improvement Council at Wake Forest. Both Drs. Strowd are passionate educators and both have received faculty teaching awards during their time at Wake Forest.