Medicine Institute

Prepare to make a positive impact through medicine.

Interested in donning the white coat, but not sure what being a healthcare professional is really like? Gain hands-on experience into the medical field and insight into the many career opportunities available within the various disciplines of medicine. You’ll visit healthcare facilities in Charlotte and Winston-Salem, participate in simulations and labs, and learn basic skills like taking blood pressure and suturing.

At a Glance

Medicine Institute: Charlotte
Dates: June 9-14, 2019 and June 23-28, 2019
Eligibility: Rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors in high school and incoming college freshmen
Program Length: 1-week sessions
Program Tuition: $1,700 (Non-Residential), $2,600 (Residential)
Residential or Non-Residential: Non-Residential and Residential Options Available

Medicine Institute: Winston-Salem
Dates: June 23-28, 2019 and July 7-12, 2019
Eligibility: Rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors in high school and incoming college freshmen
Program Length: 1-week sessions
Program Tuition: $2,600
Residential or Non-Residential: Residential Option Only

**Courses carry no secondary school or college credit. Upon completion of the program, an official Wake Forest University certificate of achievement will be awarded to all Medicine Institute participants.

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What You’ll Experience

Topics Covered:

  • Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics
  • Medical Research
  • Obstetrics and NICU
  • Emergency Medicine and Trauma Care
  • Neurosurgery
  • General Medicine
  • Ophthalmology

Hands-on Experiences:

  • On-site visits to healthcare facilities in Charlotte and Winston-Salem
  • Tour the Wake Forest School of Medicine and participate in simulation labs
  • Explore technology and the latest in medical advances within the hospital including the operating room and cardiac cath lab
  • Practice taking blood pressure, listening to the heart, working in a suture lab, conducting an ultrasound, and dissecting a pig heart
  • Experience minimally invasive surgery techniques

*Hands-on experiences are subject to change.

Medicine Institute Costs

Charlotte Campus (Nonresidential Program) | $1,700

Charlotte Campus (Residential Program) | $2,600

Reynolda Campus (Residential Program) | $2,600

A Day in the Life

  • 8:00 – 9:00 am – Arrive and breakfast
  • 9:00 – 9:30 am – Welcome and program introduction
  • 9:30 – 10:30 am – Guest speaker: Overview of healthcare
  • 10:30 -11:00 am – Guest speaker: Pediatrics
  • 11:00 – 11:30 am – Travel to hospital
  • 11:30 am – 12:00 pm – Visit operating rooms and cath labs
  • 12:00 – 1:00 pm – Lunch
  • 1:00 – 2:00 pm – A day in the life of a physician
  • 2:00 – 3:00 pm – Wake Forest School of Medicine tour
  • 3:00 – 4:30 pm – Guest speaker: Cancer care
  • 4:30 – 5:30 pm – Debrief for next day
  • 5:30 – 6:30 pm – Dinner
  • 6:30 – 7:30 pm – Evening activities
  • 7:30 – 9:00 pm – Free time
  • 9:00 – 10:00 pm – Prepare for bed
  • 10:00 pm – Lights out

*This “A Day in the Life” sample schedule is based upon the 2018 curriculum and is subject to change. 

medicineStephen L. Wallenhaupt, MD

Academic Leader, Medicine Institute (Charlotte)

Dr. Stephen L. Wallenhaupt served as Novant Health’s Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, 2006-2014. He retired in January 2016. From 2001-2006 he served as the Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs of Presbyterian Healthcare in the Charlotte region. He is a board certified Cardiothoracic surgeon and formerly a partner of Hawthorne Cardiovascular Surgeons in Charlotte, 1993-2001.

Dr. Wallenhaupt was an instructor and assistant professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Wake Forest University School of Medicine from 1985-1993. He received his medical degree from Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University in 1978. He is a member of multiple medical organizations including the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American College of Surgeons, American College of Chest Physicians, American Medical Association, American College of Physician Executives, and the North Carolina Medical Society. He is on the Medical Alumni Association Board of Wake Forest University School of Medicine and a member of the Wake Forest Charlotte Executive Board.

Lindsay Strowd, MD

Academic Leader, Medicine Institute (Winston-Salem)

Lindsay Strowd is currently an Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Wake Forest Baptist Health and also serves as Core Teaching Faculty for the School of Medicine. Dr. Strowd attended Duke University and graduated in 2005 then went on to complete her medical school training at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She completed her intern year in internal medicine followed by three years of dermatology residency where she served as chief resident. Dr. Strowd’s current clinical interests include cutaneous lymphoma, complex medical dermatology and inpatient dermatology.

 

Roy Strowd, MD

Academic Leader, Medicine Institute (Winston-Salem)

Roy Strowd is currently an Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neuro-Oncology at Wake Forest Baptist Health. Dr. Strowd attended Duke University and graduated in 2005 then went on to complete his medical school training at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. He completed his intern year in internal medicine followed by three years of neurology residency where he served as chief resident. He completed his fellowship in Neuro-Oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2015 prior to moving back to Winston-Salem. Dr. Strowd’s current clinical and research interests include clinical trials for novel brain tumor therapies, the impact of cancer and chemotherapy on immune function, and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Dr. Strowd serves as Core Teaching Faculty for the Wake Forest School of Medicine, directs the Health Professions Education Institute for career development in medical education, and serves on the editorial boards of two premiere journals in neurology and neuro-oncology.

Both Drs. Strowd were elected to Alpha Omega Alpha honor society as junior members during medical school and both were recipients of the Arnold P. Gold Humanism in Medicine award. They were part of the student group who founded the successful student-run DEAC free health clinic and helped found the Resident Quality Improvement Council at Wake Forest. Both Drs. Strowd are passionate educators and both have received faculty teaching awards during their time at Wake Forest.